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Welcome to the world of
The Miri Hand Knotted Masterworks

Every Miri hand knotted rug inspires the imagination. The beauty of each piece evokes fascination. Each sample retains and revives the aura of the very best of past Persian tradition.

The virtue of Miri artwork is due to thoroughly studied designs, the use of locally produced hand-spun wool, natural dyes, traditional techniques, and most importantly, the knotters, those whose dexterity and creativity is valued above all.

Miri’s organizational structure includes several provinces namely Fars, Azarbayjan, and Kurdistan, as well as cities such as Hamedan, Malayer and Kashan. Rugs are knotted in homes and tents and in small and large knotting units. Both tribal and urban rugs are crafted in their own locale using local methods with strict periodic supervision.

Miri’s qualitative evolution occurred steadily during the last decades, and we pledge ourselves to maintain the path. Miri will, as in the past, steadfastly adhere to its philosophy of knotting the highest value pieces without compromising "quality" for "growth".

All experienced observers are aware that carpet production in Iran has experienced a steep crises in the period from 1925 through about 1990. Even today, many carpet traders, in order to sell more at cheaper prices, resort to self-defeating policies by using synthetic fibres instead of pure wool, mass production of identical designs rather than creating unique and innovative designs.

They have also used to 'false' knots instead of the truly traditional ones. Inferior quality carpets are thus being produced in Iran, as well as in other nations that copy traditional Persian designs.

It was in such circumstances that Miri undertook to breathe new life into carpet weaving in Iran. Thanks to close collaboration with a small number of Iranian producers/exporters and in light of a well considered strategy, Miri strived to generate the renaissance of the Iranian art of the knot.